HRP Papers (free)
Home ] Doctrinal Papers (free) ] European Symbols ] Various editions of US & Britain ]


Related Links:  
Origin of Nations forum   HWA & Church of God Library   Friends of the Sabbath

 

                      Rare WCG & AC Theses, Papers, Lectures    Further Research into Bible Doctrines

Key:   RP = Research/Discussion Paper/Article              BS = Bible Study              RN = Research Notes

To be able to read PDF documents, download the free Adobe PDF reader here


Topic

Title

Category

Format & Size

Date

(latest version)

Date

(original version)

Study Paper Outlines (outlines of papers below)

PDF (120KB)

Feb

2007

2001

Origin of Nations Papers

Some Notes on the True Roots and Origin of the Scots (best viewed with Acrobat Reader 6.0)

RP

PDF

(1.6MB)

2003

2003

 

Appendices to 'Some Notes on the True Roots and Origin of the Scots'

RP

PDF

(1.9MB)

2003

2003

 

The Biblical Origin of Nations: An Introduction to the Table of Nations (About HRP)

RP

PDF

(30KB)

2006

1982

 

Elam (NOTE: This article is in Serbian)

RP

PDF (24KB)

2002

2002

 

A Note on the Hyksos

RN

PDF

(24KB)

2002

2002

Papers by others

Decline and Fall of the Anglo-Saxon-Keltic Nations Prophesied! by HW Armstrong

 

PDF

(1MB)

2000

1956

 

"How did the Natives of Australia become acquainted with the Demigods and Daemonia and with the Superstitions of the Ancient Races?", Journal of the Ethonological Society of London - by W.A. Miles, Commissioner of Police, Sydney; pages 4-50.

 

PDF

(2.8MB)

1854

 
 

Early Civilizations of the Nordic Peoples - by RP (the author unwittingly reveals the descendants of Arphaxad)

 

PDF

(1.2MB)

1965

1965

 

A History and Comparison of various editions of the US & Britain in Prophecy - authored by N Bartch

 

HTML

2000

 

Origins of Nations Magazine

Origins of Nations Magazine Index: 1994-2000

 

HTML (69.2KB)

2001

2001

 

Volume 1, Issue 1

 

HTML (20.5KB)

1994

 
 

Volume 1, Issue 2

 

HTML (48.6KB)

1995

 
 

Volume 1, Issue 3

HTML (43.4KB)

1995

 
 

Volume 1, Issue 4

 

HTML (77KB)

1995

 
 

Volume 2, Issue 1

 

HTML (17.1KB)

1996

 
 

Volume 2, Issue 2

 

PDF (628KB)

1996

 
 

Volume 2, Issue 3

 

PDF (806KB)

1997

 
 

Volume 2, Issue 4 - Volume 3, Issue 1

 

PDF (0.98MB)

1997-98

 
 

Volume 3, Issue 2

PDF (748KB)

1999

 
 

Volume 3, Issue 3

 

PDF (637KB)

1999

 
 

Volume 3, Issue 4

 

PDF (1.65MB)

1999

 
 

Volume 4, Issue 1

 

PDF (522KB)

2000

 

The author has employed a style that is neither scholarly (designed for high end scholastic journals and unintelligible to many) nor chatty and journalistic (styles used in novels and newspapers). Instead, he prefers one that straddles both areas.


Moreover, he also prefers to write succinctly rather than in a verbose manner. Life is too short to write 20,000 words when the same message could expressed in 5,000. This will lessen the time needed by the already time-consumed reader. In addition, almost everything he writes is from a new perspective, building upon the Church of God teachings not undoing them. In other words, he prefers to value add to them with new research and thinking.


If a subject has already been written and researched, he prefers to avoid duplicating efforts, even if there might be some differences of opinion between him and the research, booklet or book. It is only if he can add value to the subject that he ventures into the particular area and writes on it.

 

For, what is the benefit of going over old ground that has already been explored? It may be self-serving and showing off. But adds nothing to our body of knowledge. Our corpus of knowledge must be expanded upon with more and more proofs, not rehashing someone else's writings. Today's technology makes this much too easy - it often leads to cheating and forms of plagiarism.

 

But real research comes from pouring through libraries; analysis; critique; examining all points of view; knowing one's subject; cross-referencing; debating with others; contacting organisations and people for further insights/information etc. Such results in quality research and depth. This takes time - the misuse of modern technology bypasses this and leads to very shallow outcomes. There is no excuse for laziness. But today's generation does not seem to be interested in quality.